Download 1938 AVRO Chess Tournament by Robert; Dale Brandreth; Sherwood PDF

By Robert; Dale Brandreth; Sherwood

167 pages, hardback

Full notes to all of the video games PLUS a few first-class pictures and huge observation at the prelude and aftermath to this nice occasion, the most powerful match ever held as much as that time.

The AVRO event used to be held within the Netherlands in 1938, subsidized via the Dutch broadcasting corporation AVRO. the development was once a double round-robin event. The 8 avid gamers usually considered as the most powerful on this planet took half: global Champion Alexander Alekhine, former champions José Raúl Capablanca and Max Euwe, destiny champion Mikhail Botvinnik and challengers Paul Keres, Reuben high quality, Samuel Reshevsky and Salo Flohr.

The annotations are clean and consider the commentaries by way of the good contestants themselves through the years. they're incomparably higher than any earlier notes.

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5. 6. 7. P-K5 P-QB3 P-KB4 PxP Kt-KB3 P-QB4 Kt-QB3 PxP Q-Kt3 Kt-R3 II 3. P-K5 4. P-QB3 5. Kt-B3 P-QB4 Kt-QB3 P-B3 In both cases the initiative falls to Black, in the first through the attack on White's Q4, the mainstay of White's centre; in the second through attack on White's K5, the White centre itself. We must therefore consider White's advance of P-K5 on the third move as premature. Let us now find out whether it is advantageous to effect the same subsequently. g. 3. Kt-QB3, Kt-KB3. If White plays P-K5 now he gains time for his advance of P-KB4, as Black's Knight must retreat.

At Q3 is open to constant attacks and is difficult to defend. --------------------------------------8 | #R | #Kt| #B | #Q | #K | #B | #Kt| #R | |---------------------------------------| 7 | #P | #P | | #P | | #P | #P | #P | |---------------------------------------| 6 | | | | | | | | | |---------------------------------------| 5 | | | #P | | | | | | |---------------------------------------| 4 | | | | | ^P | | | | |---------------------------------------| 3 | | | ^Kt| | | ^Kt| | | |---------------------------------------| 2 | ^P | ^P | | | | ^P | ^P | ^P | |---------------------------------------| 1 | ^R | | ^B | ^Q | ^K | ^B | | ^R | --------------------------------------A B C D E F G H Diag.

Black has succeeded in eliminating the White centre pawn, and sweeps long diagonals with his Bishops, but the advantage cannot be maintained. White exchanges the Bishop at Q6, and there remains a backward pawn, which Black will hardly be able to hold permanently. In practice it has been shown that the end-game should be won by White in spite of Bishops of opposite colours, as Black's pawn at his QB4 is difficult to defend. 16. Kt-K4, B-Kt2; 17. KtxB (not BxP because of BxB; 18. KtxB, BxP followed by Q-Kt4ch), PxKt; 18.

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